20 Years of PHP

Ben Ramsey shared how he got started with PHP and had the great idea of asking others to write about their stories and tagging it as #20yearsofphp. This is my story.

When I graduated from college in 2000, I began looking for a job without a clear idea of what I wanted to do. In grad school I had done some projects using HTML, ASP, and ShockWave for various professors and figured I could get a job building web sites until I decided on something. I replied to a job posting (I think it was on hotjobs.com) and in September 2000 I started working as a web developer at Forum One. Thanks to that job, I spent a week working in San Francisco after meeting my (future) wife on a previous trip to California. We’d get married in 2004.

At the time, PHP4 had just been released. I worked on projects which still used PHP3, or interfaced via Perl CGI scripts to save data in a custom-build in-house CMS. I think my first actual PHP project was for a local Jewish Temple. Like other junior devs at that job, I took a shot at replacing the Perl scripts with my own PHP versions. Luckily, I never inflicted them on my colleagues.

From there, PHP was a gateway to learning about Linux, web servers, databases & SQL, and so much more. Thanks to PHP (and Drupal) I worked for my favorite soccer team, D.C. United. Today I’m grateful that, through running php[architect] I get to work not only with Eli, Kevin, Sandy, and Heather on daily basis but also with the wider PHP community through php[architect]’s magazine, books, and conferences.

I don’t think I could have planned the last 15 years better. Here’s to the next 20!

 

Nielesen: Designing Effective Carousels

I wrote a roundoup of articles explaining why carousels are bad and kill clickthrus earlier. Jakob Nielsen provides some advice on how to design one properly if you really must have one.

Summary: Carousels allow multiple pieces of content to occupy a single, coveted space. This may placate corporate infighting, but on large- or small-view ports, people often scroll past carousels. A static hero or integrating content in the UI may be better solutions. But if a carousel is your hero, good navigation and content can help make it effective.

From: Designing Effective Carousels

Carousels are bad for Accessibility

I’ve never been a fan of carousels. They’ve become a crutch for designers and clients who want to spice up a homepage presentation with something that moves. ShoulIUseACarousel was shared by a lot of folks I follow, NetMagazine did an interview with the accessibility expert who created the site.

JS: Carousels are seemingly an easy fix to two universal design problems: how do I fit so much content into so little space, and how do I decide what content is the most important? It’s easy to justify away the usability issues of a carousel when you consider the benefits of presenting multiple content pieces in such little real estate

From: Accessibility expert warns: stop using carousels | News | .net magazine

From an information architecture perspective, Travis Lafleur provides a better alternative. In spirit, it’s very similar to the approach we used on DCUnited.com back when I was there.

Consider this simple, straightforward alternative. First, determine essential content to be featured on the page. Keep in mind the desired outcomes of the project as a whole, the mindset and goals of your users, and what actions you want them to take on the particular page. Next, prioritize. This can be as simple as assigning numbers to each item. If users notice only one thing on the page, what should that be? If they notice two, what should the second be? – and so on. If you’re having trouble prioritizing – or have too many items to promote – consider breaking the content into logical groups and spreading it over multiple pages.

From: Biggs|Gilmore – A Critique of Carousels

It turns out they also don’t lead users to take meaningful actions.

I’m sure you’ve come across dozens, if not hundreds of image sliders or carousels (also called ‘rotating offers’). You might even like them. But the truth is that they’re conversion killers.

From: Don’t Use Automatic Image Sliders or Carousels, Ignore the Fad

Eric Runyon has the stats to back this up, click through to see how many people click beyond the first slide.

Carousels. That gem of a web feature that clients love, and many developers hate. One thing is certain, they are the darling of HigherEd. In fact, they’re loved so much, I’ve been assigned many times to retroactively add them to sites that have already been live for years. This led me ask how much are users really interacting with the carousels.

From: Carousel Interaction Stats | WeedyGarden

Finally, Jack Shepard lists better alternatives to using a carousel slide.

Let me preface this by saying this discovery is not anything new, however unless you’re really geeking out you won’t be in the know on this stuff.

From: The cure for the common image slider carousel